Agnes Thecla Walz,

Birth of a sisterEleanor Marie Walz
July 3, 1925
Citation details:

page 8

Birth of a brotherLouis Francis Walz
November 6, 1926
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page 9

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page 140

Birth of a sisterLucille Ann Walz
August 6, 1928
Birth of a brotherAloys Benedict Walz
August 10, 1929
Citation details:

page 11

Birth of a sisterFlorentine Lula Walz
November 7, 1931
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page 13

Death of a maternal grandmotherMary Gertrude Dols
November 22, 1933
Burial of a maternal grandmotherMary Gertrude Dols
November 25, 1933
Death of a paternal grandfatherJoseph Walz
December 29, 1933
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page 1

Birth of a brotherJoseph Michael Walz
August 24, 1934
Citation details:

page 15

Death of a maternal grandfatherChristoph Flottemesch
October 5, 1935
Burial of a maternal grandfatherChristoph Flottemesch
October 7, 1935
Anecdote between 1936 and 1939

Note: She attended public school instead of Catholic school so that her uncle Tom Walz would have enough students for his school bus. She remembered riding the 4 miles in the sleigh when it was so very cold.
Anecdote between 1939 and 1942

Note: She attended CSt. Michael School Catholic school for the 4th through 8th grades.
Death of a fatherBenedict Leonard Walz
September 8, 1964
Burial of a fatherBenedict Leonard Walz
September 11, 1964
Anecdote 1978

Note: As State President of her Kappa Kappa Iota Sorority, she was representing Wyoming at the national meeting in Des Moines, Iowa, when she received a phone message that her mother had died. She made reservations to take the plane home the next morning, when she received another phone call saying that her husband Al was in the hospital, and they really didn't know what was the matter. She had to make a decision. She felt her Mom and Dad would have liked for her to be at her husband's side, so she cancelled her plane reservation and drove back to Casper. She was the only one of the ten children who did not make the funeral.
Death of a motherElizabeth Josephine Flottemesch
June 29, 1978
Burial of a motherElizabeth Josephine Flottemesch
July 1, 1978
Anecdote 1986

Note: Thecla wrote a poem for the 1986 Walz family reuni…

Thecla wrote a poem for the 1986 Walz family reunion. It was published by the Mahnomen Pioneer, the local newspaper the following week:

THE WALZ FAMILY by Thecla Walz Hjelmstad 1986

This poem I'll recite, about that family of ten, Children of Mahnomen farmers, Elizabeth and Ben. The farm was not large, the house was too small But many fond memories are held by us all.

CHRISTOPHER, the oldest, determined our fate, When high school he chose, we all had a date To fulfill our education four years after eight, While he toiled on the farm, from early to late. Thank you, Chris, we all owe you one, That decision of yours, wasn't all that much fun!

CATHERINE came next to join the family; No one suspected a nurse she would be. Daily on her siblings, she practiced for free; Fixing a cut, a bruise, or the sting of a bee. You became a great nurse, Kay, we are proud of you; You are a professional in all that you do.

ELMER you are the brother none of us knew, Would you have liked farming as older you grew? All of us have wondered, when we've a moment or two - Why God chose to take you, before we knew you. But things happen for the best, as what will be, will be, And you, dear Elmer are a fond memory.

ELEANOR followed next, our curly haired girl. You will never know how much we envied all those brown curls. Convent school, marriage, three boys and a girl, You sped down life's road with a flourish and whirl. To your folks, to your family, of yourself you share, Qualities like yours are indeed very rare.

Fifth child born was brother LOUIS A sailor, a mechanic, ambulaance driver, busy bee- Wherever there is action, that's where Louis will be- Always willing to accept, and take responsibility. Hang in there, Louis, your ship will come in yet, Bearing the rewards you've earned, on that you can bet.

Next is our middle girl, LUCILLE Ann, A talented lady with the pots and the pans. She's tiny, and pretty, with a Real Estate Man, Who keeps her traveling in many, many lands. We think you are happy with your niche found in life, It's homey, comfortable and lacking in strife.

Brother ALOYS , the farmer, is next on our family tree, Making things grow, keeping things free. You work hard with handicaps of ear and of knee, Never taking a rest; never letting things just be. The rewards you've earned are not only from the soil, God gives to those who for him has toiled.

I, THECLA came next in that family of ten, Making no waves, making no dents. Until an uncle drove right through that fence, My retort gave a chuckle to ladies and gents. A teacher I became, touching many a child's life, As well as mother, a grandmother, a homemaker and wife.

FLORENTINA messed up things just a bit When she turned out a girl, the boys had a fit. So a tomboy she became with pigtails and mitt, She was almost a boy, so everything fit. To California she went, a bar owner to become, A cook, a nurse, and mother to some.

ANTHONY was our musical man. He is a charmer and can lead a band. When that pretty girl found him, he no longer ran; He became a machinist, a police chief, and a parksman. Papa you kept guessing to the very end For in you he always saw very much of him.

JOE Joe is the caboose of the ten. You evened the sexes of ladies and men. You took over the farm- each rooster, each hen, You built a new home and filled up the bins. It couldn't have been easy, being last of the bunch, So much extra love from eleven people would make most of us crunch.

And so MAMA and PAPA, as you look down from afar, Each of us knows just where you are. You did a good job while you lived on this nook, You left it three farmers, two nurses, a cook, A bookkeeper, teacher, machinist and look! We are all here together to celebrate the Walz name- We hope you are proud of each of us as we've played out life's game.

Anecdote 1990

Note: As I was the seventh child, not even Mama remembered me as a baby. My eyes were crossed, so I got glasses at an early age of 3. I broke them when I must have been about four and carry the scar today. Another incident at this early age is remembered by all of us. It seems Uncle Mike Walz came to see us with his car and crashed into the fence as he drove into the yard. It seems I remarked "My Papa opens the fence, and then drives through". Uncle Mike thought this quite funny, and repeated it often - and once again when I was a senior in high school and visited him when he was ill. Another childhood incident I recall is when Mama and Papa got into the only spat I can remember. Many of the brothers and sisters said it was because I was in a school performance which took extra time and money. I felt so, so guilty, but then it turned out not to be what they were upset about. What a relief! While in second grade I got vaccinated for smallpox. Mrs. Stevenson said I didn't know what I was, when asked if we were part Indian. She said since my cousins were part Indian, we must be too, so vaccinated I was! I also remember Mrs. Stevenson misplacing my glasses, and then tell Mama and Papa I had lost them. Not too pleasant of memories of second grade. I loved to hear Papa sing and play the accordion. I tried some about age ten, but didn't do much more than 'Turkey in the Straw" and "Casey Jones". I wasn't very good. After high school I worked as a secretary as well as a waitress. I then moved to Casper and married Al and had three children. We are very proud of our children, and how hard they worked for their professions. After having three children, I worked as an elementary secretary for seven years, began college which I completed in two and one half years, and then got a M.Ed in Education. I taught fifth grade for 17 years, then took early retirement. Al worked at the Refinery for 35 years, finishing as a heavy equipment operator.. He proved the Worlds Greatest Dad when I went to college, taking full care of three teenage children alone. Al has a great sense of humor, and enjoys life. Our hobbies include fishing, hunting, boating, square dancing, golfing, playing cards, water skiiing, cross country skiing, and socializing with friends.
Death of a brotherChristopher Joseph Walz
April 18, 1995
Death of a brotherLouis Francis Walz
December 11, 1995
Death of a husbandAlvin Gordon Hjelmstad
August 11, 2001
Note: Cardiac Arrest
Burial of a husbandAlvin Gordon Hjelmstad
August 15, 2001
Anecdote December 2001
Death of a brotherJoseph Michael Walz
December 20, 2002
Death of a sisterLucille Ann Walz
January 16, 2006
Burial of a sisterLucille Ann Walz
January 23, 2006
Death of a brotherAloys Benedict Walz
May 20, 2006
Death of a sisterFlorentine Lula Walz
February 27, 2017
Death of a sisterEleanor Marie Walz
April 9, 2017
Burial of a sisterEleanor Marie Walz
April 21, 2017
Death of a sisterCatherine Elizabeth Walz
January 12, 2018
Burial of a sisterCatherine Elizabeth Walz
January 23, 2018
Family with parents
father
Ben Walz Family Portait
18901964
Birth: February 22, 1890 39 37Paynesville, Minnesota
Death: September 8, 1964his home, Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
mother
WP_20141011_014
18951978
Birth: May 2, 1895 30 26Jordan, Scott, Minnesota
Death: June 29, 1978Mahnomen Nursing Center, Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
brother
19211995
Birth: July 11, 1921 31 26Calloway, Becker County, Minnesota
Death: April 18, 1995Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
23 months
sister
Kay Mullin 1945
19232018
Birth: June 14, 1923 33 28Mahnomen, Minnesota
Death: January 12, 2018Casper, Natrona, Wyoming
12 months
brother
19241924
Birth: May 26, 1924 34 29Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
Death: May 26, 1924
13 months
sister
Ben Walz Daughters Eleanor Kay
19252017
Birth: July 3, 1925 35 30Mahnomen, Minnesota
Death: April 9, 2017Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
16 months
brother
19261995
Birth: November 6, 1926 36 31Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: December 11, 1995Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
21 months
sister
Ben Walz Daughters Eleanor Kay
19282006
Birth: August 6, 1928 38 33Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: January 16, 2006Central Wyoming Hospice Home, Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming
12 months
brother
19292006
Birth: August 10, 1929 39 34Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: May 20, 2006Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
herself
sister
Ben Walz Daughters Eleanor Kay
19312017
Birth: November 7, 1931 41 36Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: February 27, 2017Norwalk, California
brother
Private
brother
19342002
Birth: August 24, 1934 44 39Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: December 20, 2002Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
Family with Alvin Gordon Hjelmstad
husband
WP_20141115_004
19222001
Birth: August 7, 1922 40 32Milton, North Dakota
Death: August 11, 2001Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming
herself
son
son
Private
daughter
Private
Family with Private
husband
Private
herself
Anecdote

She attended public school instead of Catholic school so that her uncle Tom Walz would have enough students for his school bus. She remembered riding the 4 miles in the sleigh when it was so very cold.

Anecdote

She attended CSt. Michael School Catholic school for the 4th through 8th grades.

Anecdote

As State President of her Kappa Kappa Iota Sorority, she was representing Wyoming at the national meeting in Des Moines, Iowa, when she received a phone message that her mother had died. She made reservations to take the plane home the next morning, when she received another phone call saying that her husband Al was in the hospital, and they really didn't know what was the matter. She had to make a decision. She felt her Mom and Dad would have liked for her to be at her husband's side, so she cancelled her plane reservation and drove back to Casper. She was the only one of the ten children who did not make the funeral.

Anecdote

Thecla wrote a poem for the 1986 Walz family reunion. It was published by the Mahnomen Pioneer, the local newspaper the following week:

THE WALZ FAMILY by Thecla Walz Hjelmstad 1986

This poem I'll recite, about that family of ten, Children of Mahnomen farmers, Elizabeth and Ben. The farm was not large, the house was too small But many fond memories are held by us all.

CHRISTOPHER, the oldest, determined our fate, When high school he chose, we all had a date To fulfill our education four years after eight, While he toiled on the farm, from early to late. Thank you, Chris, we all owe you one, That decision of yours, wasn't all that much fun!

CATHERINE came next to join the family; No one suspected a nurse she would be. Daily on her siblings, she practiced for free; Fixing a cut, a bruise, or the sting of a bee. You became a great nurse, Kay, we are proud of you; You are a professional in all that you do.

ELMER you are the brother none of us knew, Would you have liked farming as older you grew? All of us have wondered, when we've a moment or two - Why God chose to take you, before we knew you. But things happen for the best, as what will be, will be, And you, dear Elmer are a fond memory.

ELEANOR followed next, our curly haired girl. You will never know how much we envied all those brown curls. Convent school, marriage, three boys and a girl, You sped down life's road with a flourish and whirl. To your folks, to your family, of yourself you share, Qualities like yours are indeed very rare.

Fifth child born was brother LOUIS A sailor, a mechanic, ambulaance driver, busy bee- Wherever there is action, that's where Louis will be- Always willing to accept, and take responsibility. Hang in there, Louis, your ship will come in yet, Bearing the rewards you've earned, on that you can bet.

Next is our middle girl, LUCILLE Ann, A talented lady with the pots and the pans. She's tiny, and pretty, with a Real Estate Man, Who keeps her traveling in many, many lands. We think you are happy with your niche found in life, It's homey, comfortable and lacking in strife.

Brother ALOYS , the farmer, is next on our family tree, Making things grow, keeping things free. You work hard with handicaps of ear and of knee, Never taking a rest; never letting things just be. The rewards you've earned are not only from the soil, God gives to those who for him has toiled.

I, THECLA came next in that family of ten, Making no waves, making no dents. Until an uncle drove right through that fence, My retort gave a chuckle to ladies and gents. A teacher I became, touching many a child's life, As well as mother, a grandmother, a homemaker and wife.

FLORENTINA messed up things just a bit When she turned out a girl, the boys had a fit. So a tomboy she became with pigtails and mitt, She was almost a boy, so everything fit. To California she went, a bar owner to become, A cook, a nurse, and mother to some.

ANTHONY was our musical man. He is a charmer and can lead a band. When that pretty girl found him, he no longer ran; He became a machinist, a police chief, and a parksman. Papa you kept guessing to the very end For in you he always saw very much of him.

JOE Joe is the caboose of the ten. You evened the sexes of ladies and men. You took over the farm- each rooster, each hen, You built a new home and filled up the bins. It couldn't have been easy, being last of the bunch, So much extra love from eleven people would make most of us crunch.

And so MAMA and PAPA, as you look down from afar, Each of us knows just where you are. You did a good job while you lived on this nook, You left it three farmers, two nurses, a cook, A bookkeeper, teacher, machinist and look! We are all here together to celebrate the Walz name- We hope you are proud of each of us as we've played out life's game.

Anecdote

As I was the seventh child, not even Mama remembered me as a baby. My eyes were crossed, so I got glasses at an early age of 3. I broke them when I must have been about four and carry the scar today. Another incident at this early age is remembered by all of us. It seems Uncle Mike Walz came to see us with his car and crashed into the fence as he drove into the yard. It seems I remarked "My Papa opens the fence, and then drives through". Uncle Mike thought this quite funny, and repeated it often - and once again when I was a senior in high school and visited him when he was ill. Another childhood incident I recall is when Mama and Papa got into the only spat I can remember. Many of the brothers and sisters said it was because I was in a school performance which took extra time and money. I felt so, so guilty, but then it turned out not to be what they were upset about. What a relief! While in second grade I got vaccinated for smallpox. Mrs. Stevenson said I didn't know what I was, when asked if we were part Indian. She said since my cousins were part Indian, we must be too, so vaccinated I was! I also remember Mrs. Stevenson misplacing my glasses, and then tell Mama and Papa I had lost them. Not too pleasant of memories of second grade. I loved to hear Papa sing and play the accordion. I tried some about age ten, but didn't do much more than 'Turkey in the Straw" and "Casey Jones". I wasn't very good. After high school I worked as a secretary as well as a waitress. I then moved to Casper and married Al and had three children. We are very proud of our children, and how hard they worked for their professions. After having three children, I worked as an elementary secretary for seven years, began college which I completed in two and one half years, and then got a M.Ed in Education. I taught fifth grade for 17 years, then took early retirement. Al worked at the Refinery for 35 years, finishing as a heavy equipment operator.. He proved the Worlds Greatest Dad when I went to college, taking full care of three teenage children alone. Al has a great sense of humor, and enjoys life. Our hobbies include fishing, hunting, boating, square dancing, golfing, playing cards, water skiiing, cross country skiing, and socializing with friends.