Ben Walz Family Portait

Benedict Leonard WalzAge: 74 years18901964

Birth February 22, 1890 39 37
Publication: 1950
Publication: 1964
Birth of a brotherMartin Killian Walz
May 3, 1891 (Age 14 months)
Birth of a sisterBarbara Margaret Walz
August 29, 1892 (Age 2 years)
Birth of a brotherThomas John Walz
October 1, 1894 (Age 4 years)
Birth of a brotherLudwig Frederick Walz
May 31, 1896 (Age 6 years)
Death of a brotherLudwig Frederick Walz
1896 (Age 5 years)

Birth of a sisterMargaret Eva Walz
May 8, 1898 (Age 8 years)
Birth of a sisterAnna Marie (Mary) Walz
July 2, 1899 (Age 9 years)
Anecdote about 1900 (Age 9 years)

Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Note: Young Benedict was in about the 3rd grade when his father lost his store and farms in a bad investment. After that, Ben went to work and received no more schooling.
Death of a sisterMary Margaret (Anna) Walz
November 29, 1904 (Age 14 years)
Anecdote about 1905 (Age 14 years)

Publication: 5 Feb 2013
Note: Ben had surgery to remove his appendix. As he hovered near death, they left the incision open for four days to encourage healing.
Death of a maternal grandfatherFrans M. Roeder Kirchner
March 29, 1907 (Age 17 years)
Death of a paternal grandfatherJohann Michel Walz
April 10, 1908 (Age 18 years)
Anecdote about 1915 (Age 24 years)

Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 138
Publication: 5 Feb 2013
Note: Young Ben played a squeezebox accordion and harmonica at many dances in the northern U.S. and Canada. He played by ear, having had no music lessons. He also traveled with steam threshing crews in Minnesota and Dakota.
Milit-Beg 1917 (Age 26 years)
Publication: 1964
Publication: 5 Feb 2013
Note: serving in a military hospital
Milit-Draft June 5, 1917 (Age 27 years)
Anecdote

Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 3
Note:
After Ben and Lizzie were married, they tried farming on Granpa Walz's farm in Mahnomen, without much success. Papa then moved his family to town and drove 'livery' for Uncle 'Frank. From there they moved to the Overmiller place where Lucille was born. Then for a short time they moved to a small farm near Selmer Quall where Aloys was born, and from there in 1929 drove their cattle to the only farm I can remember, four miles northwest of Mahnomen. Mama had an imitation Christmas tree with red berries in the attic of the house. I don't remember using it, but I would have liked to have that tree. I don't know what happened to it. I do remember using real lighted candles, which we made from wax, on everygreen boughs taken from the trees in the yard. We had old butter churn in the granary, but I don't know what happend to it either. We made homemade summer sausage, and meat sausage when we butchered - using cleaned intestines. We all remember the cooler in the pump house where we cooled the homemade beer and butter, and the old cellar where we kept homemade sourkraut. home canned fruit, vegetables and potatoes. On Sunday our family made two trips to church as we couldn't all get into the Model A at once. Some of us children, including me, started the Model A once - not knowing how to stop it - as it headed towards the creek! We picked berries and plums every summer, climbing the trees, leaning and swaying the tree trunk of the tree to bend it down so we could reach the berries. One summer we hoed corn for a nearby farmer for 10 cents an hour, and pooled our money to get a used bicycle. We all took turns riding it, 15 minutes at a time. We always got lunch hour on the farm. We ate at 12 noon, and didn't have to go back to work until one. I remember lying on the grass watching the clouds go by, making up poems, dreaming, and fantasizing. We had fun. We played Keep-Away, One-O-Cat, and tag on the windmill and barn roof. Chris had so many ideas that we all helped him make; an igloo, a giant snow and ice slide, on which we would slide down into the creek bottom; we built a Merry-Go-Round of an old wagon wheel, fashioning seats on poles extending from the center. (Neighbors got sick riding that one, but we didn't). We also made skiis for sleigh riding time. Pretty good skiis too! We rolled barrels with our feet, rode down the hill on the road. inside old tires, and, of course, argued with each-other. We made fun out of our work too, whenever we could. We used to wish the grain binder would break down so that we would have extra time from shocking grain to play Mumbley Peg, or knife, until the binder was fixed and we had to get to work again. One windy day we put about 24 bundles into one shock! Dad never figured it was our wishing so hard that helped make the binder break down! We all loved thrashing time, even though it meant cooking, cooking, cooking, and work, work, work. We had a lot of fun with all the neighbors helping each other out. I used to love to ride to the thrashing machine on a load of bundles whenever time permitted. And, afterwards, there was always a thrashing party at our house After Chris made the decision to go to high school, it was pretty much expected that we would all go. I am very grateful to Chris for that decision, as we all completed high school. Memories wouldn't be complete without mentioning making homemade beer. One year we fed the fermented barley to the pigs, and laughed and laughed at them. Remember too when someone suggested putting raisins in the beer, and the caps kept shooting off the bottles? We also made root beer, but that wasn't as exciting. Fourth of July was a big day. We had 'Dutch Lunch" (crackers, cheese, hot dogs, and store-bought ice cream in cones!) What a dummy. I used to like frankfurters better than home raised beef!. We made homemade ice cream all winter, but didn't appreciate it then. Hand-me-downs were an everyday occurrence. I remember a black coat with a fur collar which went from Kay to Eleanor, to Lucille, and then on to me. Needless to say, it was much out of style. Mom decided it was too worn out for Tina to wear. I'm sure all of us can remember a hand-me-down that was hideous. Remember the electric fence, and all trying to touch it, then learning how the last in line got the biggest shock? Also, remember mother BBQing venison under the trees - on the grill? We called the meat "Goverment Sheep". As I taught school years later I realized just how much we learned on the farm, and in such a matter-of-fact way. Today's students would be lucky to spend some time on a farm and learn the many free lessons. Remember the skiis we made from popple trees - how they had to be planed, cut into boards, boiled in hot water and shaped. (Of Course, Chris did most of the work). Pretty good skiis. Also we had a big, big sled. Horses pulled the sleigh, with the big sled behind, and the the skiis behind the larger sled.. We had fun. Neighbors envied our sleigh rides, and often came over to join us, especially on Christmas day. Life on the farm was hard work, and hard play, and lots of fun with sister, brothers and neighbors.
Anecdote

Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 138
Note: He served on the Marsh Creek Town Board and as an election officer.
Anecdote

Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Note: When he died, all ten of his children were able to attend his funeral.
Anecdote

Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Note:
Ben was born into a rather affluent family. Several of his brothers attended college, but Papa completed only third grade, as that was when the family moved to the St.Pierre Farm, and Grandpa had no money left. Papa was ten years old then. He grew up helping on the farm, and at an early age began traveling with the Steam Threshing crews to northern Minnesota and North Dakota. Experience became his teacher. He learned to play the accordion, harmonica, and violin, and played at many dances, in fact wore out seven accordions doing so. I remember Papa singing, especially on Sunday mornings when times weren't too rushed. He sang many songs which I tried to learn. I can't remember most of them now, but recognize them when I hear them. But we all remember his playing 'Red Wing' and 'Turkey in the Straw. We all would sit at his feet, surrounding him as he played. Those were happy times. I can also remember a song he sang about someone 'sticking her nose in the butter'. Papa was a great story-teller. He had had so many experiences to share. It would have been wonderful to have a record of some of his stories about the steam engines, and his work as a livery driver, especially his stories about old Doctor Archibald. I remember his telling stories of 'expelling the devil'. and other strange things that I would try to imagine as he told them. Papa also talked about how his sister died of diptheria as a teenager. He spoke about Black Diptheria and how it could kill in just a day or two. We also remember his stories of his Appendicitis operation and how he nearly died, and heard the doctors say he had no chance. It seems that his brothers paid for his operation, which was very uncommon at that time (about 1910) and was very experimental and expensive. Papa and Mama were generous and caring to others besides the family. I remember, as I'm sure we all do, Mama and Papa giving most of their 'Christmas Money" to the Stolka family where it was badly needed. Mama and Papa had finally had a fair crop, and were planning a better Christmas for us that year. We had less that year than planned, but the Stolka family had a good Christmas too! Papa was a very patient and calm person, but we all remember that when the binder broke down while cutting grain, he could use some colorful words. I think we all listened carefully so that if we became angry we would know some words to use. Papa was blessed with a great sense of humor which endeared him to all he knew. I remember when he was on the town board, and he spoke of those other members and farmers trying to 'run water uphill', I remember him laughing while playing Hasenpfeffer with the Will brothers, and looking on the bright side when things got tough, even when we were 'hailed out'. I personally remember when Dad put roast chicken on my plate, and then asked me how I liked it. It was roast beef, which I had been refusing to eat. I was about five. I remember getting only one spanking, which I dearly deserved. I was sitting on the bench , and he had me get out to get my spanking. I think that must have been about age 4 or 5 too. Papa often quoted proverbs from the Bible. I guess he had learned them from his father. I quoted them, probably wrongly , to my children too. I especially remember one little story he told (Not a proverb) about the girl walking through the woods trying to find the straightest stick, and how she came out with a very crooked one. He compared this to us girls looking for the 'perfect man', and how we might land up with a 'bad one' if we wanted to have perfection. Mama used to get upset when Papa put his cigarette ashes on her Amerillys Plant. It always bloomed at Easter time, but it bloomed the day Papa was buried, September 8th, 1964 Papa also found his old Elgin pocket watch buried in the mud in front of the granary. It had been lost for 20 years, but ran after it was cleaned. I don't know what happened to that watch. (I now know - 2003 -that Tony has preserved the watch in a case with its history.) Papa was always slim and trim. He did put on weight when he quit smoking. He really complained when he puffed leaning over to tie his shoes. He soon lost the extra pounds. Papla believed in fate. He always said that when your time was up, it was up. Mama said when she asked Dad as he was dying what she was going to do, he answered "I don't know" for the first time in their marriage. Note: Papa was a gentle man, always caring. Although neither of them showed outward affection such as hugging and kissing, we always knew that Mama and Papa loved and wanted each of us. He tried so hard to give Mama the material things she wanted, but that they couldn't afford. But mother on the other hand, did a wonderful job of making our home as nice as possible with what little money she had.
Description
Medium Tall, Medium Build, Brown Eyes and Brown Hair
June 5, 1917 (Age 27 years)
Death of a sisterMargaret Eva Walz
1918 (Age 27 years)
Occupation
He ran livery for his brother Frank. He also drove Dr. Archibald on his rounds.
between 1918 and 1920 (Age 27 years)
Publication: 5 Feb 2013
Death of a motherMary Julia Kirchner
June 22, 1921 (Age 31 years)
Birth of a son
#1
Christopher Joseph Walz
July 11, 1921 (Age 31 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 5
Birth of a daughter
#2
Catherine Elizabeth Walz
June 14, 1923 (Age 33 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 7
Birth of a son
#3
Elmer Walz
May 26, 1924 (Age 34 years)
Death of a sonElmer Walz
May 26, 1924 (Age 34 years)

Birth of a daughter
#4
Eleanor Marie Walz
July 3, 1925 (Age 35 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 8
Birth of a son
#5
Louis Francis Walz
November 6, 1926 (Age 36 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 9
Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 140
Birth of a daughter
#6
Lucille Ann Walz
August 6, 1928 (Age 38 years)
Publication: 19 Jan 2006
Birth of a son
#7
Aloys Benedict Walz
August 10, 1929 (Age 39 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 11
Birth of a daughter
#8
Florentine Lula Walz
November 7, 1931 (Age 41 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 13
Death of a fatherJoseph Walz
December 29, 1933 (Age 43 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 1
Birth of a son
#9
Joseph Michael Walz
August 24, 1934 (Age 44 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 15
Anecdote between 1923 and 1934 (Age 32 years)
Note: Birth Certificates for Kids
Death of a brotherFrances Xavier Walz
February 2, 1935 (Age 44 years)
Milit-Draft April 27, 1942 (Age 52 years)
Death of a brotherMartin Killian Walz
October 10, 1942 (Age 52 years)

Death of a brotherMichael Phillip Walz
November 28, 1949 (Age 59 years)
Death of a brotherMarcus Edward Walz
May 25, 1950 (Age 60 years)
Death of a sisterSophia Elizabeth Walz
September 21, 1951 (Age 61 years)
Death of a brotherWilliam Henry Walz
January 16, 1955 (Age 64 years)
Anecdote 1955 (Age 64 years)

Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 138
Note: Ben retired from the farm and lived in Mahnomen until his death.
Death of a sisterAnna Marie (Mary) Walz
December 6, 1957 (Age 67 years)
Death of a brotherNicholas Frederick Walz
January 8, 1963 (Age 72 years)
Burial of a brotherNicholas Frederick Walz
January 9, 1963 (Age 72 years)
Cause of Death September 8, 1964 (on the date of death)

Note: coronary thrombosis
Description
five feet, ten inches tall

Publication: 5 Feb 2013
Death September 8, 1964 (Age 74 years)
Burial September 11, 1964 (3 days after death)
Publication: 1964
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: May 1, 1873St. Martin, Stearns, Minnesota
1 year
elder brother
20 months
elder brother
Joseph George Walz
Birth: January 5, 1876 24 23St. Martin (Lake Henry), Minnesota
Death: February 8, 1968Walker, Minnesota
2 years
elder brother
22 months
elder brother
18 months
elder brother
17 months
elder sister
Mary Margaret (Anna) Walz
Birth: January 15, 1883 31 30Cold Springs, Minnesota
Death: November 29, 1904White Earth, Minnesota
18 months
elder brother
18 months
elder sister
Catherine Eva Walz
Birth: January 17, 1886 35 33Paynesville, Minnesota
Death: March 28, 1966Brownsville, Minnesota
3 years
elder sister
19 months
himself
14 months
younger brother
16 months
younger sister
2 years
younger brother
20 months
younger brother
23 months
younger sister
14 months
younger sister
Family with Elizabeth Josephine Flottemesch - View this family
himself
wife
son
Christopher Joseph Walz
Birth: July 11, 1921 31 26Calloway, Becker County, Minnesota
Death: April 18, 1995Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
23 months
daughter
11 months
son
13 months
daughter
16 months
son
Louis Francis Walz
Birth: November 6, 1926 36 31Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: December 11, 1995Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
21 months
daughter
Ben Walz Daughters Eleanor KayLucille Ann Walz
Birth: August 6, 1928 38 33Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: January 16, 2006Central Wyoming Hospice Home, Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming
1 year
son
Aloys Benedict Walz
Birth: August 10, 1929 39 34Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: May 20, 2006Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
daughter
daughter
Ben Walz Daughters Eleanor KayFlorentine Lula Walz
Birth: November 7, 1931 41 36Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: February 27, 2017Norwalk, California
son
Private
son
Joseph Michael Walz
Birth: August 24, 1934 44 39Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: December 20, 2002Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota

BirthAgnes Thecla Walz delayed birth certificate, Record Type: Delayed Certificate of Birth, Name Of Person: Agnes Thecla Walz, File Number: no. 38630
Publication: 1950
BirthBenedict L. Walz death certificate, Record Type: Certificate of Death, Name Of Person: Benedict L. Walz, Number: no. 11107
Publication: 1964
AnecdoteWalzing Family Memories, 1850-1990
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
AnecdoteThecla Trujillo interview, Interviewer: Hjelmstad, Teri, Informant Address: Mills, WY
Publication: 5 Feb 2013
AnecdoteMahnomen County Heritage
Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 138
Milit-BegBenedict L. Walz death certificate, Record Type: Certificate of Death, Name Of Person: Benedict L. Walz, Number: no. 11107
Publication: 1964
Milit-DraftDraft Card Ben Walz Ben WWI, Record Type: Photo
AnecdoteWalzing Family Memories, 1850-1990
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 3
AnecdoteMahnomen County Heritage
Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 138
AnecdoteWalzing Family Memories, 1850-1990
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
AnecdoteWalzing Family Memories, 1850-1990
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
DescriptionBen Walz WW1 Draft Card, Record Type: Photo, Subject: Ben Walz
OccupationThecla Trujillo interview, Interviewer: Hjelmstad, Teri, Informant Address: Mills, WY
Publication: 5 Feb 2013
AnecdoteBirth Index Ben Walz Children, Record Type: Photo, Subject: Ben Walz Family
Milit-DraftDraft Registration Benedict Walz 1942, Record Type: Photo
AnecdoteMahnomen County Heritage
Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 138
Cause of DeathBenedict L. Walz death certificate, Record Type: Certificate of Death, Name Of Person: Benedict L. Walz, Number: no. 11107
Publication: 1964
NameBenedict L. Walz death certificate, Record Type: Certificate of Death, Name Of Person: Benedict L. Walz, Number: no. 11107
Publication: 1964
DescriptionThecla Trujillo interview, Interviewer: Hjelmstad, Teri, Informant Address: Mills, WY
Publication: 5 Feb 2013
DeathBenedict L. Walz death certificate, Record Type: Certificate of Death, Name Of Person: Benedict L. Walz, Number: no. 11107
Publication: 1964
BurialBenedict L. Walz death certificate, Record Type: Certificate of Death, Name Of Person: Benedict L. Walz, Number: no. 11107
Publication: 1964
BurialBen Walz Tombstone, Record Type: Photo, Name Of Person: Ben Walz
BurialBurial Benedict Walz 1964 Card: Burial Benedict Walz 1964 Card
BurialObituary Benedict Walz 1964, Record Type: Image
Anecdote
Young Benedict was in about the 3rd grade when his father lost his store and farms in a bad investment. After that, Ben went to work and received no more schooling.
Anecdote
Ben had surgery to remove his appendix. As he hovered near death, they left the incision open for four days to encourage healing.
Anecdote
Young Ben played a squeezebox accordion and harmonica at many dances in the northern U.S. and Canada. He played by ear, having had no music lessons. He also traveled with steam threshing crews in Minnesota and Dakota.
Milit-Beg
serving in a military hospital
Anecdote
Birth Certificates for Kids
Anecdote
Ben retired from the farm and lived in Mahnomen until his death.
Cause of Death
coronary thrombosis
Anecdote
After Ben and Lizzie were married, they tried farming on Granpa Walz's farm in Mahnomen, without much success. Papa then moved his family to town and drove 'livery' for Uncle 'Frank. From there they moved to the Overmiller place where Lucille was born. Then for a short time they moved to a small farm near Selmer Quall where Aloys was born, and from there in 1929 drove their cattle to the only farm I can remember, four miles northwest of Mahnomen. Mama had an imitation Christmas tree with red berries in the attic of the house. I don't remember using it, but I would have liked to have that tree. I don't know what happened to it. I do remember using real lighted candles, which we made from wax, on everygreen boughs taken from the trees in the yard. We had old butter churn in the granary, but I don't know what happend to it either. We made homemade summer sausage, and meat sausage when we butchered - using cleaned intestines. We all remember the cooler in the pump house where we cooled the homemade beer and butter, and the old cellar where we kept homemade sourkraut. home canned fruit, vegetables and potatoes. On Sunday our family made two trips to church as we couldn't all get into the Model A at once. Some of us children, including me, started the Model A once - not knowing how to stop it - as it headed towards the creek! We picked berries and plums every summer, climbing the trees, leaning and swaying the tree trunk of the tree to bend it down so we could reach the berries. One summer we hoed corn for a nearby farmer for 10 cents an hour, and pooled our money to get a used bicycle. We all took turns riding it, 15 minutes at a time. We always got lunch hour on the farm. We ate at 12 noon, and didn't have to go back to work until one. I remember lying on the grass watching the clouds go by, making up poems, dreaming, and fantasizing. We had fun. We played Keep-Away, One-O-Cat, and tag on the windmill and barn roof. Chris had so many ideas that we all helped him make; an igloo, a giant snow and ice slide, on which we would slide down into the creek bottom; we built a Merry-Go-Round of an old wagon wheel, fashioning seats on poles extending from the center. (Neighbors got sick riding that one, but we didn't). We also made skiis for sleigh riding time. Pretty good skiis too! We rolled barrels with our feet, rode down the hill on the road. inside old tires, and, of course, argued with each-other. We made fun out of our work too, whenever we could. We used to wish the grain binder would break down so that we would have extra time from shocking grain to play Mumbley Peg, or knife, until the binder was fixed and we had to get to work again. One windy day we put about 24 bundles into one shock! Dad never figured it was our wishing so hard that helped make the binder break down! We all loved thrashing time, even though it meant cooking, cooking, cooking, and work, work, work. We had a lot of fun with all the neighbors helping each other out. I used to love to ride to the thrashing machine on a load of bundles whenever time permitted. And, afterwards, there was always a thrashing party at our house After Chris made the decision to go to high school, it was pretty much expected that we would all go. I am very grateful to Chris for that decision, as we all completed high school. Memories wouldn't be complete without mentioning making homemade beer. One year we fed the fermented barley to the pigs, and laughed and laughed at them. Remember too when someone suggested putting raisins in the beer, and the caps kept shooting off the bottles? We also made root beer, but that wasn't as exciting. Fourth of July was a big day. We had 'Dutch Lunch" (crackers, cheese, hot dogs, and store-bought ice cream in cones!) What a dummy. I used to like frankfurters better than home raised beef!. We made homemade ice cream all winter, but didn't appreciate it then. Hand-me-downs were an everyday occurrence. I remember a black coat with a fur collar which went from Kay to Eleanor, to Lucille, and then on to me. Needless to say, it was much out of style. Mom decided it was too worn out for Tina to wear. I'm sure all of us can remember a hand-me-down that was hideous. Remember the electric fence, and all trying to touch it, then learning how the last in line got the biggest shock? Also, remember mother BBQing venison under the trees - on the grill? We called the meat "Goverment Sheep". As I taught school years later I realized just how much we learned on the farm, and in such a matter-of-fact way. Today's students would be lucky to spend some time on a farm and learn the many free lessons. Remember the skiis we made from popple trees - how they had to be planed, cut into boards, boiled in hot water and shaped. (Of Course, Chris did most of the work). Pretty good skiis. Also we had a big, big sled. Horses pulled the sleigh, with the big sled behind, and the the skiis behind the larger sled.. We had fun. Neighbors envied our sleigh rides, and often came over to join us, especially on Christmas day. Life on the farm was hard work, and hard play, and lots of fun with sister, brothers and neighbors.
Anecdote
He served on the Marsh Creek Town Board and as an election officer.
Anecdote
When he died, all ten of his children were able to attend his funeral.
Anecdote
Ben was born into a rather affluent family. Several of his brothers attended college, but Papa completed only third grade, as that was when the family moved to the St.Pierre Farm, and Grandpa had no money left. Papa was ten years old then. He grew up helping on the farm, and at an early age began traveling with the Steam Threshing crews to northern Minnesota and North Dakota. Experience became his teacher. He learned to play the accordion, harmonica, and violin, and played at many dances, in fact wore out seven accordions doing so. I remember Papa singing, especially on Sunday mornings when times weren't too rushed. He sang many songs which I tried to learn. I can't remember most of them now, but recognize them when I hear them. But we all remember his playing 'Red Wing' and 'Turkey in the Straw. We all would sit at his feet, surrounding him as he played. Those were happy times. I can also remember a song he sang about someone 'sticking her nose in the butter'. Papa was a great story-teller. He had had so many experiences to share. It would have been wonderful to have a record of some of his stories about the steam engines, and his work as a livery driver, especially his stories about old Doctor Archibald. I remember his telling stories of 'expelling the devil'. and other strange things that I would try to imagine as he told them. Papa also talked about how his sister died of diptheria as a teenager. He spoke about Black Diptheria and how it could kill in just a day or two. We also remember his stories of his Appendicitis operation and how he nearly died, and heard the doctors say he had no chance. It seems that his brothers paid for his operation, which was very uncommon at that time (about 1910) and was very experimental and expensive. Papa and Mama were generous and caring to others besides the family. I remember, as I'm sure we all do, Mama and Papa giving most of their 'Christmas Money" to the Stolka family where it was badly needed. Mama and Papa had finally had a fair crop, and were planning a better Christmas for us that year. We had less that year than planned, but the Stolka family had a good Christmas too! Papa was a very patient and calm person, but we all remember that when the binder broke down while cutting grain, he could use some colorful words. I think we all listened carefully so that if we became angry we would know some words to use. Papa was blessed with a great sense of humor which endeared him to all he knew. I remember when he was on the town board, and he spoke of those other members and farmers trying to 'run water uphill', I remember him laughing while playing Hasenpfeffer with the Will brothers, and looking on the bright side when things got tough, even when we were 'hailed out'. I personally remember when Dad put roast chicken on my plate, and then asked me how I liked it. It was roast beef, which I had been refusing to eat. I was about five. I remember getting only one spanking, which I dearly deserved. I was sitting on the bench , and he had me get out to get my spanking. I think that must have been about age 4 or 5 too. Papa often quoted proverbs from the Bible. I guess he had learned them from his father. I quoted them, probably wrongly , to my children too. I especially remember one little story he told (Not a proverb) about the girl walking through the woods trying to find the straightest stick, and how she came out with a very crooked one. He compared this to us girls looking for the 'perfect man', and how we might land up with a 'bad one' if we wanted to have perfection. Mama used to get upset when Papa put his cigarette ashes on her Amerillys Plant. It always bloomed at Easter time, but it bloomed the day Papa was buried, September 8th, 1964 Papa also found his old Elgin pocket watch buried in the mud in front of the granary. It had been lost for 20 years, but ran after it was cleaned. I don't know what happened to that watch. (I now know - 2003 -that Tony has preserved the watch in a case with its history.) Papa was always slim and trim. He did put on weight when he quit smoking. He really complained when he puffed leaning over to tie his shoes. He soon lost the extra pounds. Papla believed in fate. He always said that when your time was up, it was up. Mama said when she asked Dad as he was dying what she was going to do, he answered "I don't know" for the first time in their marriage. Note: Papa was a gentle man, always caring. Although neither of them showed outward affection such as hugging and kissing, we always knew that Mama and Papa loved and wanted each of us. He tried so hard to give Mama the material things she wanted, but that they couldn't afford. But mother on the other hand, did a wonderful job of making our home as nice as possible with what little money she had.
Milit-DraftDraft Card Ben Walz Ben WWIDraft Card Ben Walz Ben WWI
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 800 × 473 pixels
File size: 100 KB
Milit-DraftDraft Card Index Ben Walz WWIDraft Card Index Ben Walz WWI
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 800 × 631 pixels
File size: 151 KB
DescriptionDraft Card Ben Walz Ben WWIDraft Card Ben Walz Ben WWI
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DescriptionDraft Card Index Ben Walz WWIDraft Card Index Ben Walz WWI
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AnecdoteBirth Index Ben Walz Children.
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Milit-DraftDraft Registration Benedict WaDraft Registration Benedict Wa
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Milit-DraftDraft Registration Benedict WaDraft Registration Benedict Wa
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Milit-DraftDraft Registration Benedict Wa
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Cause of DeathDeath Benedict Leonard Walz 19Death Benedict Leonard Walz 19
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DeathDeath Benedict Leonard Walz 19Death Benedict Leonard Walz 19
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DeathDeath Benedict Walz 1964.pdf
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BurialTombstone Ben Walz 1964Tombstone Ben Walz 1964
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BurialTombstone Ben Walz 1964Tombstone Ben Walz 1964
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BurialTombstone Walz Family Marker,Tombstone Walz Family Marker,
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BurialBurial Benedict Walz 1964 Card
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BurialObituary Benedict Walz 1964.pd
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Media objectBen Walz Family PortaitBen Walz Family Portait
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Media objectWP_20141011_002WP_20141011_002
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Media objectWP_20141011_014WP_20141011_014
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