Kay Mullin 1945

Catherine Elizabeth WalzAge: 94 years19232018

Name
Catherine Elizabeth Walz
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 7

Catherine Elizabeth Mullin

Name
Catherine Elizabeth Mullin
Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 139
Birth June 14, 1923 33 28
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 7
Birth of a brotherElmer Walz
May 26, 1924 (Age 11 months)
Death of a brotherElmer Walz
May 26, 1924 (Age 11 months)

Birth of a sisterEleanor Marie Walz
July 3, 1925 (Age 2 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 8
Birth of a brotherLouis Francis Walz
November 6, 1926 (Age 3 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 9
Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 140
Birth of a sisterLucille Ann Walz
August 6, 1928 (Age 5 years)
Publication: 19 Jan 2006
Birth of a brotherAloys Benedict Walz
August 10, 1929 (Age 6 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 11
Birth of a sisterFlorentine Lula Walz
November 7, 1931 (Age 8 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 13
Death of a maternal grandmotherMary Gertrude Dols
November 22, 1933 (Age 10 years)
Burial of a maternal grandmotherMary Gertrude Dols
November 25, 1933 (Age 10 years)
Publication: 1933
Death of a paternal grandfatherJoseph Walz
December 29, 1933 (Age 10 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 1
Birth of a brotherJoseph Michael Walz
August 24, 1934 (Age 11 years)
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 15
Death of a maternal grandfatherChristoph Flottemesch
October 5, 1935 (Age 12 years)
Burial of a maternal grandfatherChristoph Flottemesch
October 7, 1935 (Age 12 years)
Publication: 1935
Death of a fatherBenedict Leonard Walz
September 8, 1964 (Age 41 years)
Burial of a fatherBenedict Leonard Walz
September 11, 1964 (Age 41 years)
Publication: 1964
Death of a motherElizabeth Josephine Flottemesch
June 29, 1978 (Age 55 years)
Burial of a motherElizabeth Josephine Flottemesch
July 1, 1978 (Age 55 years)
Publication: 3Jul1978
Occupation
a nurse

Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 138
Anecdote 1990 (Age 66 years)

Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 7
Note:
Kay had the second toughest job in the family as she was the eldest girl, and second in order. She remembers Grandpa and Grandma Flottemesch, and spent time down on their farm. A highlight of her life was winning a very large beautiful doll in second grade. Mrs. Stevens, her teacher, helped her to win the doll, and we all got a chance to play with it. It had eyes that even opened and shut! Once when Mama and Papa went somwhere, Kay had to try to cook and keep house for all of us. I remember thinking that she was tough. Now I can imagine what nine brothers and sisters can do to you when you are responsible. Kay used to practice nursing on us, or so it seemed to me! I never could look at blood and sores, but she did a good job patching us up. We wonder if it helped her nursing career. Kay went to nursing school with the help of the Army during World War II, and became a Registered Nurse. She came out to Wyoming to work, and eventually led both Lucille and me to stray out to Casper too. She married Gene Mullen and had three children, all the while nursing in Obstetrics and in the Emergency Room. Connie and Jack now work for the Post Office, and Linda lives in California with her husband Tom. Kay and Gene (who worked at the refinery) kept bees for a while. Many said it was the best honey in town. Kay also baked lovely cakes for people. They entertained themselves with bowling and fishing. Since the children have married and left home, they are retired and collecting aluminum cans for pin money to go to Las Vegas and have fun. Gene was the victim of very bad arthritis in the early 50's. It mishaped his hands, and really gave him alot of pain. Kay is a great cook. When she became allergic to Penicillin and many other foods. She had to cook most of the foods she was allowed to eat. Her cooking will make your mouth water, especially her apple pie. Katy has always been ready and willing to help anyone in the family, no matter how busy she is , and most important, she really cares about all of us. I would describe Kay as an optimist, philantropist, friendly, but most of all, she cares.
Death of a brotherChristopher Joseph Walz
April 18, 1995 (Age 71 years)
Death of a brotherLouis Francis Walz
December 11, 1995 (Age 72 years)
Death of a brotherJoseph Michael Walz
December 20, 2002 (Age 79 years)
Anecdote 2003 (Age 79 years)

Note: Year 2003. Gene has been ill for the past year, and is very ill today. Kay is caring for him, but she did have to take him to the hospital, and they have him in ICU. They (Kay and Gene) have a great grand daughter, Taylor, who was the "apple of their eyes" until little Brandon came along, and they now have two great grand children who they help care for three days a week - loving every minute of it. Kay retired in the early 1980"s, but hasn't lost her 'touch' in nursing. She is one of the best nurses Casper ever had, and ran the Emergency room for quite a few years before her retirement. Kay does alot of 'fancy work' and has made lovely pictures, bedspreads and doilies.
Death of a sisterLucille Ann Walz
January 16, 2006 (Age 82 years)
Publication: 19 Jan 2006
Burial of a sisterLucille Ann Walz
January 23, 2006 (Age 82 years)
Death of a husbandJoseph Eugene Mullin
March 16, 2006 (Age 82 years)
Publication: 18 Mar 2006
Burial of a husbandJoseph Eugene Mullin
March 22, 2006 (Age 82 years)
Publication: 18 Mar 2006
Death of a brotherAloys Benedict Walz
May 20, 2006 (Age 82 years)
Death of a sisterFlorentine Lula Walz
February 27, 2017 (Age 93 years)
Death of a sisterEleanor Marie Walz
April 9, 2017 (Age 93 years)
Burial of a sisterEleanor Marie Walz
April 21, 2017 (Age 93 years)
Death January 12, 2018 (Age 94 years)
Burial January 23, 2018 (11 days after death)
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
elder brother
Christopher Joseph Walz
Birth: July 11, 1921 31 26Calloway, Becker County, Minnesota
Death: April 18, 1995Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
23 months
herself
11 months
younger brother
13 months
younger sister
16 months
younger brother
Louis Francis Walz
Birth: November 6, 1926 36 31Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: December 11, 1995Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
21 months
younger sister
Ben Walz Daughters Eleanor KayLucille Ann Walz
Birth: August 6, 1928 38 33Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: January 16, 2006Central Wyoming Hospice Home, Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming
1 year
younger brother
Aloys Benedict Walz
Birth: August 10, 1929 39 34Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: May 20, 2006Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
sister
younger sister
Ben Walz Daughters Eleanor KayFlorentine Lula Walz
Birth: November 7, 1931 41 36Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: February 27, 2017Norwalk, California
brother
Private
younger brother
Joseph Michael Walz
Birth: August 24, 1934 44 39Mahnomen, Mahnomen County, Minnesota
Death: December 20, 2002Mahnomen, Mahnomen, Minnesota
Family with Joseph Eugene Mullin - View this family
husband
herself
daughter
Private
daughter
Private
son
Private
Joseph Eugene Mullin + Mary Corey - View this family
husband
husband’s wife
Marriage: March 21, 1946Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming
13 months
step-son
James Eugene Mullin
Birth: May 2, 1947 23 21Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming
Death: November 8, 1948Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming

BirthWalzing Family Memories, 1850-1990
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 7
OccupationMahnomen County Heritage
Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 138
AnecdoteWalzing Family Memories, 1850-1990
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 7
NameWalzing Family Memories, 1850-1990
Publication: Thecla Hjelmstad, Mills, Wyoming, 1990
Citation details: page 7
NameMahnomen County Heritage
Publication: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas, 1991
Citation details: page 139
DeathObituary Kay Mullin 2018: Obituary Kay Mullin 2018
BurialObituary Kay Mullin 2018: Obituary Kay Mullin 2018
Anecdote
Kay had the second toughest job in the family as she was the eldest girl, and second in order. She remembers Grandpa and Grandma Flottemesch, and spent time down on their farm. A highlight of her life was winning a very large beautiful doll in second grade. Mrs. Stevens, her teacher, helped her to win the doll, and we all got a chance to play with it. It had eyes that even opened and shut! Once when Mama and Papa went somwhere, Kay had to try to cook and keep house for all of us. I remember thinking that she was tough. Now I can imagine what nine brothers and sisters can do to you when you are responsible. Kay used to practice nursing on us, or so it seemed to me! I never could look at blood and sores, but she did a good job patching us up. We wonder if it helped her nursing career. Kay went to nursing school with the help of the Army during World War II, and became a Registered Nurse. She came out to Wyoming to work, and eventually led both Lucille and me to stray out to Casper too. She married Gene Mullen and had three children, all the while nursing in Obstetrics and in the Emergency Room. Connie and Jack now work for the Post Office, and Linda lives in California with her husband Tom. Kay and Gene (who worked at the refinery) kept bees for a while. Many said it was the best honey in town. Kay also baked lovely cakes for people. They entertained themselves with bowling and fishing. Since the children have married and left home, they are retired and collecting aluminum cans for pin money to go to Las Vegas and have fun. Gene was the victim of very bad arthritis in the early 50's. It mishaped his hands, and really gave him alot of pain. Kay is a great cook. When she became allergic to Penicillin and many other foods. She had to cook most of the foods she was allowed to eat. Her cooking will make your mouth water, especially her apple pie. Katy has always been ready and willing to help anyone in the family, no matter how busy she is , and most important, she really cares about all of us. I would describe Kay as an optimist, philantropist, friendly, but most of all, she cares.
Anecdote
Year 2003. Gene has been ill for the past year, and is very ill today. Kay is caring for him, but she did have to take him to the hospital, and they have him in ICU. They (Kay and Gene) have a great grand daughter, Taylor, who was the "apple of their eyes" until little Brandon came along, and they now have two great grand children who they help care for three days a week - loving every minute of it. Kay retired in the early 1980"s, but hasn't lost her 'touch' in nursing. She is one of the best nurses Casper ever had, and ran the Emergency room for quite a few years before her retirement. Kay does alot of 'fancy work' and has made lovely pictures, bedspreads and doilies.
Note
Written by Kay Walz Mullen 1989 When I was very small, we moved to town from the Walz farm (which became Uncle Tom's farm later). We lived above the delivery barn, which was owned by Uncle Frank. Dad went to work for Uncle Frank driving 'livery'(delivery). Often he had to take Dr. Archibald on his rural house calls. Brother Louis was born when we lived in town. From there we moved about 3 miles west of town to the Spaeth place. Here two more children were born, Lucille and Aloys. It was here that the oldest, Christopher, started school, 1st grade. He had about 2 miles to walk to school. I also started - only went for a short time before moving. There was no Kindergarten in the country. Our next home is the home place. There was a fire in the upstairs of the place before we moved there. Dad was one of the neighbors who helped put out the fire, possibly a chimney fire. I remember I was old enough to help drive the cattle from the Spaeth place to our new home. We slept upstairs and would lay there, and look at the burned 2x 4's on the roof. The only heat was a small register above the pot-bellied stove down stairs. Then the folks bought some green oil cloth and put it up so we didn't have to look at those burned 2x 4's. When we started school after getting settled, we rode the bus. It wasn't a bus. It was car as there weren't many children in that area at the time. Uncle Tom was the driver. I can remember being upset because when we started in town, I had to go back and take Kindergarten first. I can think back going to school at 52 degrees below zero. In the winter time, one couldn't make the roads in a car. Uncle Tom had an enclosed sled on runners, and we went to school in that. It was drawn by horses. We all had our own foot warmers. These were pieces of concrete. Uncle Tom would get them real hot and wrap them in a gunny sack to hold the heat. At least our feet were warm. There were heavy quilts we threw over our legs, and laps - often they were over our heads - just to keep warm going the 4 miles to school. All ten of us children were in school at one time! Dad played at barn dances -wore out 7 accordions, also could play the violin and harmonica. Dad would play often on Sunday evening and mother would sing along. He had no teaching, he played by ear. It was beautiful. When I went into nurses training, I was always home sick on Sunday evening. One year Dad built a new kitchen on the house for mother. So we planned a dance to celebrate on the 4th of July. Eleanor's birthday was on the 3rd. We got completely hailed out and Dad didn't have a cent of hail insurance. It was during the depression, and we couldn't afford the premium. Anyway, we were going to call it all off, but I can remember Dad's words so well. He said "Do you think not having your dance is going to bring the crops back? We will have the dance and everyone will have a good time". Everyone did somehow. We survivied! We salvaged a small amount of grain. Dad drove the binder, and I walked behind trying to get what little grain we could into bundles. The Good Lord sure took care of us that year. When I was in 2nd grade,my teacher, Miss Stevens, did all her Xmas shopping at a local drug store, and won the most beautiful doll I ever had. I had admired that doll for months through the window. My Uncle Frank told me I won after the church when we picked up the horses and open sleigh to go home. I was so excited I had no idea my teacher would have given me the doll. Those days teachers could not get married and she had no children. When I was in the 4th grade, I got scarlet fever. I can remember because we were quarantined for 3 months before everyone got it and recovered. Uncle Tom would do the milking so we could sell our cream to get butter and eggs. It really put us back in school, but we all studied hard and passed our grade. When I was 9, I spent my summer visiting Grandpa and Grandma Flottemesch in Callaway. They paid me a penny a day, and I got paid every week. I felt rich! Times were hard. One year after potato picking, Dad raked the vines and said whatever was left, which we had missed, we could have. I remember we got enough to buy a bicycle. When I was a freshman in high school, we got enough potatoes to buy our first radio. What a day that was. We really had something. We were so proud. Written in the 1990's by Kay Mullen I don't remember Grandpa Flottemesch very well. Grandma was kind to me, but I had to get up early in the morning to help get breakfast, and get my uncles off to work. I helped in the garden during the day. Every afternoon I got an hour off to do whatever I wanted - I would play with the animals. I always had to keep the separator washed and clean, and the well house clean. Every Monday Uncle Herman or Uncle Joe would go for groceries. They always brought me a nickels worth of candy. I remember mother always going out to the garden every afternoon about one or two o'clock to weed. Always in the hottest part of the day. Maybe it was best, the weeds would melt! I had to help when the seed onions and carrots came up. I would weed the rows with a table fork, so as not to pull up the plants. During canning season she was always busy . I remember cutting corn off the cob, enough for about one hundred quarts!. She would get the cabbage ready and I sliced it in the fall into crock jars in the unfinished basement. I worked in the fields in June and July. I remember on day we were putting up hay. It was 100 degrees and 100% humidity! Just a little warm!. I and Chris generally started school in October rather than September - after potato picking time. My senior year in high school, I got on 'Federal Aid". I worked in the school library every day taking care of the 1-6 grades. Got $3.00 a month! Felt rich!. Made enough to buy my class ring. $16.00. Note: I am very grateful to Kay for writing her autobiography. I asked all the brothers and sisters to do the same, but she is the only one who took time to let our future family know about her life. * * * * * * * *
DeathObituary Kay Mullin 2018.pdf
Format: application/pdf
File size: 424 KB
BurialObituary Kay Mullin 2018.pdf
Format: application/pdf
File size: 424 KB
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